John Hinckley Jr, Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Released From Hospital Today

John Hinckley Jr, Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Released From Hospital Today

The United States of America inhaled sharply on the afternoon of March 30, 1981. Ronald Reagan, the fortieth President of the United States had sustained a bullet wound through the chest, while three others were shot. The last U.S. President to receive a bullet wound was the 36th President, John F. Kennedy. He did not survive. So the fear and worry from the American people to learn that Reagan was wounded when a U.S. President was assassinated not even twenty years prior, had to leave the country frozen. 

John Hinckley Jr., forever infamous for the act, attempted to take the life of President Reagan, who suffered a punctured lung, but was able to recover. Police officer Thomas Delahanty and Secret Service Agent Timothy McCarthy were also wounded. James Brady, the White House Press Secretary at the time, was shot in the head and became partially paralyzed and required the use of a wheelchair. He would later die in 2014 from complications of the bullet wound he received thirty-three years earlier. The medical examiner then ruled it a homicide. 

John Hinckley Jr., who had a noted history of emotional issues, had a famous obsession with actress, Jodie Foster and acted upon the shooting in order to impress her. He was found not guilty on charges of attempted murder by reason of insanity in 1982 and instead, was admitted to St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington D.C. and remained there for the last thirty-five years until his release today.

The sixty-one-year-old is to live at the estate of his ninety-year-old mother in Williamsburg, Virginia and cannot come into any contact with the Reagan or the Brady family, Jodie Foster, nor the families of Thomas Delahanty and Timothy McCarthy.

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